Resilience 5-5-19

I have been struggling through an emotional challenge as of late. No need to share the details. I’m an open book but I still believe some things are meant to be private. A friend posted a video of the sound of birds chirping while on her walk this morning. I replied with the following comment. As I wrote about my favorite bird I was reminded that I’m not only resilient I can soar through any storm. With that said. This too shall pass. And on the days I feel like I’ve been defeated, I just have to pick myself up again and once again soar like an Iwa.

I love the sound of the birds chirping. It reminds me of being a kid during the summer time. I’d wake up to the sound of the birds chirping outside and a cool breeze coming through the window. One of my favorite birds is the Iwa. The Iwa (pronounced Eva) is a Polynesian bird that the natives look up to. They refer to this bird as “The Storm Bird”. This bird is beloved for its resilience and its ability to withstand any storm. With a wing span of 7 feet it can fly for days, even weeks looking for food. The Iwa can withstand any storm. It has the resilience to pick itself up when the wind knocks it down. When they finally find their prey, they dive in to the ocean despite the fact their feathers are not waterproof and hook their food with their hook like beak. The Iwa never travels more than 50 miles from land. The Polynesian fisherman look for the Iwa when they are fishing. If the Iwa is flying above they know they will be fruitful fisherman. Those lost at sea look for the Iwa. If they see the Iwa they know they are 50 miles from land. I love the sound of the birds chirping but I also love the resilience of this particular bird. A reminder that I can soar through any storm with the grace and resilience of that of the Iwa.

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The Iwa 5-27-18

There’s a Hawaiian bird called the Iwa. (Pronounced “Eva”) This bird is a very meaningful bird in the Polynesian culture. The Iwa is at times referred to as the “Storm Bird”. The Iwa is 43 inches long. It soars and glides gracefully with a wing span of seven feet. They often travel great distances but rarely soar further than 50 miles from land. This bird has the resilience to withstand storms, even flying for hours and days in its search for food. They are able to travel great distances. They fly offshore even though their feathers are not waterproof. They swoop down in the ocean and snatch their prey using their hook like beaks.

Polynesian fisherman look to these birds while fishing. If the Iwa is flying above them, they know they are in a good fishing area. They also look for the Iwa to find their way back home when they are out at sea.

Often times, like the Iwa, we find ourselves soaring through our own storm. Some of us have the resilience to keep flying and never give up. Others simply throw in the towel and give up. I’m not one of those people. I never give up, even on the days I want to.

There’s a passage in Matthew 6-26. It says:

“Look at the birds of the air; they do not sow or reap or store away in barns, and yet your heavenly father feeds them. Are you not more valuable than they.”

The Iwa doesn’t have waterproof feathers, yet they don’t worry. God always provides. They soar and will fly for days looking for food. If the Iwa doesn’t worry why should we? If God provides for the Iwa, he will certainly provide for you and me.

If you are facing any challenge today, remember the Iwa. Keep flying and never give up.

Today I will soar through all of my trials like the Iwa believing that no matter what, god will always provide.